Downtown Sandwich Sidewalk and Pole

Crumbling sidewalk on N. Main St. in downtown Sandwich.  Mayor Rich Robinson says that the sidewalks downtown can't be replaced until the poles are replaced. (WSPYNews.com photo by Beth Butler)

One of the questions at last Monday's Sandwich City Council Special Meeting was what sidewalks in town will be repaired first.

Aldermen discussed the repair of downtown sidewalks and sidewalks around W. W. Woodbury Elementary School at 322 E. Third St.

The sidewalk repair is part of the land swap with Midwestern Concrete and Construction, the company that will clean up the Gletty Rd. dump site.

Approximately $7,000 may be available from the land swap.

The City of Sandwich is trading 5.59 acres of land at the west end of Hall St. to Midwestern Concrete.  In return, the company will clean up the Gletty Rd. site and will use any leftover money for sidewalk repair.  The land on W. Hall St. has been appraised at $130,000.

At last Monday's meeting, alderman Fred Kreinbrink spoke about the impending sidewalk repairs.

Public Works Director Tom Horak was absent from last Monday's meeting, and Mayor Rich Robinson said he had spoken to Horak about the downtown sidewalks and how the sidewalk repair is connected to the installation of new light poles and street lights.

Alderman Kreinbrink said that addressing sidewalks in residential areas of town might be the way to go first.

Mayor Robinson said he wasn't sure if there was a priority list of sidewalks, and he said he favored fixing sidewalks near schools.

The Mayor also said he wants to address streets that have no sidewalks.

W. Knights Rd. between Prairie View School and Valley West Hospital is one of the Sandwich streets that lacks sidewalks on both sides.

The City of Sandwich set aside $180,000 for the Gletty Rd. dump site clean-up.  The question is whether the $50,000 left over from the land swap will go toward more sidewalk repairs or be spent somewhere else.

Kreinbrink said residents with crumbling sidewalks should call City Hall so the city can make a priority list.

Hear James Wyman's WSPY Radio story by clicking the link below: