Photo from Kinzinger's office

Congressman Adam Kinzinger explained his vote to remove a controversial Republican from her committees last week. Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-GA) is a freshman Republican from Georgia who has drawn bipartisan criticism for her past support of conspiracy theories.

As recently as 2018, Greene was a supporter of the QAnon conspiracy theory, and others. Greene is also said to have "liked" posts calling for violence against Democrats.

Greene has since distanced herself from QAnon and other conspiracy theories. Usually, political parties discipline their own members while the opposing party stays out of it. House Republicans decided against punishing Greene and House Democrats took the extraordinary step of using their majority to punish a member of the minority party. Some Republicans have stated that this move will start a dangerous new precedent.

Greene has since distanced herself from QAnon and other conspiracy theories. Usually, political parties discipline their own members while the opposing party stays out of it. This was the case back in 2019 when Republicans removed Iowa congressman Steve King from his committee assignments after he made racist comments. However, House Republicans have decided against punishing Greene and House Democrats took the extraordinary step of using their majority to punish a member of the minority party. Some Republicans have stated that this move will start a dangerous new precedent.

Kinzinger joined only ten other House Republicans in voting to strip Greene from her committee assignments, essentially barring the congresswoman from having input in crafting any legislation.

The six-term congressman took to Twitter to explain his vote, responding to a tweet from Greene bragging about the amount of free time she will now have. His tweet read: "This is why I voted yes. There is no remorse here for her past comments. Just a huge desire to be famous."

Kinzinger recently spoke to reporters about his future goals for reforming the Republican party from the inside.

He also addressed rumors that his stand against Trump and QAnon were politically calculated moves to run for state-wide office.

Kinzinger opened up about the personal cost of making a stand after the January 6 attack on the capitol building. He said members of his extended family disowned him and said he was following the devil.